In early years especially, boys should not be forced into a “girl-like” model of learning, explains Steve Mynard

Working in a multi-agency environment to positively engage targeted young people, Paul Rogers explains why no two days are ever the same

Primary learning mentor Ayub Malik explains why he is proud to be working with children experiencing barriers to learning

Shiraz Chakera, professional networks manager for the GTCE, describes how the Engage Network has supported early career teachers in coping with a major concern – classroom behaviour

Jeremy Cunningham shows how schools can ensure ‘just’ disciplinary procedures

Successful discipline is as much about positive reinforcement as it is about punishing bad behaviour. Ingrid Sutherland looks at the latest good practice

Get set for a raft of changes to legislation and guidance — including rules on use of force, searching and confiscation, writes Ingrid Sutherland

OU lecturer John Ralston explains how teachers undertaking practitioner research into behaviour management for their Open University course have produced real change in their schools

Lynn Cousins looks at everyday behaviour management and behaviour policy and considers what the future holds in this area

How can we help young people deal better with the losses they experience? Secondary drama teacher and SEAL coordinator Julie Leoni reflects on her own experiences

Toby Wood and Nick Guest describe how they have encouraged implementation of the SEAL materials in Peterborough primary schools.

In the first episode of her diary, drama teacher Julie Leoni writes about reconciling her emotional literacy programme with the school’s focus on targets and achievement.

Judith Harwood, senior regional adviser for the primary and secondary strategy, describes what one school has been learning from its involvement in the Social, Emotional and Behavioural Skills (SEBS) pilot.

Heather Clapp, until recently a behaviour and attendance adviser in Gloucestershire, presents thoughts and reflections on one authority’s experiences of engaging with the pilot programme for Social, Emotional and Behavioural Skills (SEBS).

Pupil discipline provisions enshrined in the Education and Inspections Act 2006 came into force in April 2007. Solicitor Dai Durbridge interprets what these measures will mean for work in schools

This article examines the role of the learning mentor and how they can be deployed in the school for the benefit of the whole learning community. David Morley reports

The contribution of students as researchers (STARS) to students’ learning and to school development can have numerous benefits. David Lucas and Dr Margaret Wood recount their experience at Deptford Green secondary school

Sue Roffey describes her way of thinking about how to relate more deeply with students in the classroom.

Using attachment theory, educational therapist Heather Geddes elaborates on James Wetz’s idea that behaviour is a form of communication about social and emotional experience that we need to understand before we decide how we are going to intervene.

This is what secondary drama teacher Julie Leoni and Bristol Learning Initiative director James Wetz said at a recent Antidote conference about the emotional factors that need addressing if we are to close the achievement gap.

Linda Thornton and Pat Brunton explore ways to use the children’s curiosity about their world to become self-motivated, independent learners.

Graham Haydon explores the role of moral constraint in influencing behaviour.

Anna Tombs reports on research into intervention work against bullying.

SENCOs who may be involved with pupils facing the possibility of exclusion should be aware that the latest guidance on procedure is now available online. With some changes in official advice this makes it an appropriate time for SENCOs to consider school policies in relation to arrangements for pupils with special educational needs and pupils with disabilities.

No matter how watertight the contract with parents, schools must implement it correctly and fairly if they want removal of a pupil to be upheld, says Mark Blois.

In an edited excerpt from his new book, clinical psychologist Steve Killick writes about the importance of listening to young people.

A lot more effort needs to go into developing young people’s emotional and social skills, writes behaviour adviser Amanda Whitehead

Education writer and former headteacher Gerald Haigh shows how ICT can be used to track pupils’ behaviour and create good, quantitative evidence on which to base action.

Programme director Claire Finka writes about how the Sheffield-based Juniper programme helps children find a way to cope with stress.

Using NPSLBA to transform behaviour and raise attendance.

Daniela Sommefeldt tells how a national programme for specialist leaders of behaviour and attendance is empowering those who attend it and inspiring them to move forward to bring about whole-school improvements in their own school context.

Attachment theory is explored here by Steve Mynard, who summarises some of the research and suggests ways that you could use this in your setting.

The successful implementation of new standards for school lunches, along with an increased uptake in school meals, is enhanced by a whole-school approach, according to research by the School Food Trust

A whole-school approach to food and health is fundamental to establishing good dietary habits and an understanding of the links between good nutrition and future health. In this article Anna Denny shows how shools can support children in leading a healthy lifestyle.

An alternative approach to behaviour management.

Build a sense of community responsibility and belonging, supported by reconciliation and the identification of positive ways of resolving difficulties and tensions.

A form of Relationship Management.

Andy Bowman reflects upon some of the learning preferences he has observed in his class, and discusses the steps he and his colleagues have taken to begin to support these

Lesley Hendy considers how the teacher’s voice affects pupils’ behaviour and their ability to learn

It often takes time to sort out problems that have arisen over the lunch break and to re-establish a learning environment. How can we reduce the hassle and get the learning in the classroom back on track more quickly after lunch?

If pupils feel safe, secure and, above all, happy at school, they are less likely to play truant and the atmosphere is more likely to be conducive to learning.

Susan Norma suggests ways of influencing students’ behaviour from a NLP perspective.

Considering the carrot or the stick: which incentives are you giving?

Linda Trapnell examines the impact of TOC on playground behaviour.

Bullying continues to hit the headlines. Despite the efforts that schools have made to get on top of the problem, three out of five secondary pupils say that they have experienced bullying. Former headteacher Roger Smith looks at ways of dealing with the instigators.

Former deputy head Marilyn Tew describes how some of the students she has worked with used TalkiT – a profiling tool that she developed and wrote about previously in Emotional Literacy Update – to overcome the emotional literacy issues that blocked their learning.

How to deal with ‘difficult’ students – their way. Barbara Prashnig suggests tips and strategies for unpleasant situations you can encounter when faced with students who are unwilling to comply with your rules.

Want to inject some freshness into the learning space? Richard Churches and Rogert Terry show to make a real difference in your classroom

When you see your name on the cover list, it’s difficult to stop your heart sinking, writes Paul Dix

Look after yourself and you’ll be in better shape to help your pupils. Phil Craig suggests eight strategies.

Paul Dix explains how organising your teaching space and your behaviour can help you to create positive behaviour patterns in your classroom

Peer support schemes can transform schools, by reducing bullying, increasing pupil confidence and involvement, and lowering teachers’ stress levels, as Carol Smart explains

Staff are to be given new powers to tackle unacceptable behaviour, if the new Education Bill secures a smooth passage through Parliament.

This evaluation of four approaches used in the Primary Behaviour and Attendance pilot study is relevant to the work of SENCOs involved in helping pupils with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. It also identifies management issues pertinent to SENCOs involved in supporting similar whole-school initiatives.

What makes Behaviour and Education Support Teams (BESTs) effective?

Parenting programmes are one aspect of the government’s Respect action plan, which could be helpful for SENCOs. The action plan will include a focus on the most problematic families coupled with a much wider extension of parenting classes to ensure parents get the help they need to fulfil their responsibilities in bringing up their children.

On 18 November 2004 the then secretary of state for education and skills, Charles Clarke, announced the government’s expectation that schools should be working in collaboration to improve behaviour and tackle truancy by September 2007.

Headteachers have welcomed the government’s plans to give them more powers to discipline students but say they are yet to be convinced that the move will make a great deal of difference in dealing with bad behaviour.

Since September 2005, as part of the new framework for inspection for children’s services, schools are expected to demonstrate how they are contributing to the five national outcomes for children stipulated by Every Child Matters and the Children Act 2004.

Ofsted’s latest report on the Behaviour Improvement Programme (BIP), Improving Behaviour and Attendance in Primary Schools shows it has had a good impact on both primary and secondary schools but in a minority of secondary schools behaviour and attendance have deteriorated.

Solution focused education is a methodology which provides a positive and pragmatic framework for managing behaviour, write Kerstin Mahlberg, Maud Sjoblom

NLP defines a number of communication categories. Richard Churches and Roger Terry explain how to use these to develop rapport with individuals and with groups

Among all students’ behaviour, gaze aversion is the one least understood, often highly annoying and most often receives a completely wrong response from teachers and parents alike, writes Barbara Prashnig

There are pros and cons to all seating patterns

Win it or lose it within the first three minutes, by Nicola Fahey

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