Muriel Thomson explores the most effective use of teaching assistants, and describes the team that she has built up in her role as director of continuing professional development and self-evaluation at Brixham College, Devon

With a more creative and flexible secondary curriculum on the horizon, Rebecca Patterson and Debra Kidd explore what it could mean for CPD

To allow full use of teaching assistants, curriculum managers need to ensure both TAs and teachers have the support they need. This involves quality line management and a clear understanding of how to plan for effective learning, Lynn Maidment explains

Are schools rising to the challenge of CPD for the whole workforce? Elizabeth Holmes investigates what schools need to do to ensure everyone receives professional development

Chris Fenton discusses the benefits of working towards the International School Award, and how it can be used to build teamwork in improving schools and impact professional development

The NCSL is doing much more than training the next generation of heads, as Crispin Andrews discovers when speaking to Paul Bennett

What are the essential characteristics for a school leader? Roger Smith reflects on what leadership is and what makes it work

Would you like to be a fly-on-the-wall at your own Ofsted inspection? Paul Williamson, assistant head of Greenbank High School, shares the insights he gained from doing just that

Last year 12 sixth-form teachers applied to TEAM (The European-Atlantic Movement) to take part in a sponsored study trip to America to deepen and broaden their knowledge of US politics, government and culture. One of them shares his experience

All NQTs will now be able to study for a Master’s level qualification. Cliff Jones puts forward three statements to provoke debate on this topic

The provision of Master’s-level credits in the PGCE is a significant milestone for the teaching profession, but what are the implications for CPD in schools asks Alison Jackson, ESCalate ITE leader at the University of Cumbria

Roger Smith considers ways in which headteachers can help their staff make the most of their careers

Early Years Update looks at the opportunities available for practitioners to gain Early Years Professional Status

In the first of new series on managing people, Early Years Update looks at the distinction between leadership and management

The BERA Professional User Reviews, published in 2003, aimed to critically inform the thinking of practitioners about research. Kate Wall uses them as a focus to argue that the closing of the theory-practice divide is becoming more and more relevant in 2008

Cliff Jones takes a look at how we behave in meetings and how they can be transformed from agonisingly sterile and unproductive events into something more useful

In 2007, Teachers TV asked educationalists at the chalkface about their experiences of performance management. Miranda Green looks at the results of the survey

Schools wishing to put in place a soundly designed system for evaluation of CPD will benefit from membership of a PPD partnership, especially in view of the growing emphasis on professional learning. Cliff Jones describes what to look for when considering joining one

Nasen promotes the development of children and young people with special educational needs (SEN). Chief executive officer Lorraine Petersen explains their CPD offering

There is a great deal that schools in difference countries can learn from each other about the problems and successes that different approaches to integrating ethnically diverse pupils into schools can offer, says headteacher Neil Berry

Lesson study is a form of classroom enquiry from the Far East that focuses on improving an aspect of teaching and learning through collaborative long-term study. Pete Dudley describes its background and how it has been adapted for use in England

Teachers are being encouraged to use evidence to improve their practice. David Leat looks at three forms of evidence-informed professional enquiry – tinkering, action research and design research

Susannah Temple uses concepts from transactional analysis to highlight an important psychological issue for teachers in developing their own identity as effective practitioners

Consultant Harriet Goodman describes two years’ work with staff at New Rush Hall special school to help build even more reflective practice

Helen Wheeler describes how the PEAL training programme helped practitioners to develop parents’ involvement in their children’s learning

Who is on hand to assist a teacher to undertake enquiry into their practice in order to improve it? Sarah Fletcher explains the role of the research mentor

David Storrie describes a course on learning outside the classroom that has allowed teachers to critically examine their school grounds

Teaching abroad is no longer seen as a sideways move that could harm career progression. Steve Caulfield of the Alice Smith School, Kuala Lumpar, describes some of the opportunities

‘Pretty scary’. Is this how pupils and students feel when asked questions or when they have to present in class? If so, does it matter and what can teachers do about it? Research by Dr Julie Anderson, academic coordinator for ESCalate, HE Academy Subject Centre for Education, based at the Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, explains

Is doing research time well spent? Mike Kelly of Ivybridge Community College, Devon, found that the results were positive for both individuals and for schools

Carol Frankl describes how the concept of the Learning Walk has been adapted for accredited SENCO training and the positive effect this has had on trainees’ perception of their work

Josephine Smith and Paul Ainsworth describe how school financial managers can contribute to school improvement by becoming involved in class observation and work scrutiny

Shiraz Chakera, professional networks manager for the GTCE, describes how the Engage Network has supported early career teachers in coping with a major concern – classroom behaviour

What about introducing the concept of a reflective learning journal to students as a blog? Geoff Tarrant, head of ICT/computing at Trinity School in Carlisle, explains how he ‘hijacked’ the new technologies loved by young people for educational use

Philip Jenkins, a P6 teacher from Dunvant Primary School in Swansea, started using Philosophy for Children and became determined to get as many of his fellow teachers involved as possible

Alison Kitson, programme leader in CPD at the TDA, discusses the kinds of questions that you might wish to ask if you were beginning to draw up a role specification for a leader or director of professional learning

Brilliant TAs, imaginative NQTs, inspiring heads, successful heads of department, and, of course, innovative CPD leaders are using and appearing on Teachers TV, writes Paul Ashton

Paul Ainsworth and Josephine Smith argue that it is increasingly important for school finance managers – especially those aspiring to lead schools – to understand the process of teaching and learning

Corina Seal describes how research lesson study was established at her school and has become embedded in its research and development activities

By training the teachers to train the pupils, the burgeoning network of science learning centres aims to put Britain back at the leading edge of scientific exploration. Alison Redmore, director of the East of England SLC at the University of Hertfordshire explores its origins and its role

The General Teaching Council of England’s Connect network provides a national mechanism for teachers to keep in contact with each other. Jane Hough, the GTC’s professional networks facilitator, describes some of the ways it helps CPD leaders to pool their knowledge

Cliff Jones presents a discussion activity that could also help you construct policy

Linda Evans looks at how SENCOs can deliver training sessions to help TAs explore different ways of supporting pupils and teachers in and out of the classroom

John Jackson looks at a new approach to leadership that puts the emphasis on integrity

Steve Adams of the NSPCC looks at the sorts of training that different members of staff require and shares some ideas for successfully carrying it out

Many school leaders don’t have professional development portfolios. David Morley looks at the benefits of creating one for yourself and the pitfalls to avoid

Why is it wrong to look for evidence, and why should teachers have more time for theory? Cliff Jones continues his series examining the meanings of CPD words and concepts in current use

Pedagogy is back on the agenda after a long period of neglect, with new guidance encouraging professionals to think about what should be taught and how it should be taught, writes Cliff Jones

OU lecturer John Ralston explains how teachers undertaking practitioner research into behaviour management for their Open University course have produced real change in their schools

The USA is huge and diverse but a quick glance at Sam Hughes Elementary School in Tuscon, Arizona, can give some idea of how professional development helps teachers, reports Susan Clark

What are the right conditions for teacher learning? Teachers need a working space where they have freedom to think, innovate and learn, say David Leat and Kate Wall

Kate Wall describes the main findings of the Learning to Learn in Schools Phase 3 project evaluation and looks at some of the implications for schools

Cliff Jones invites readers to challenge the meanings of words and concepts with more definitions of terms in current use and questions to stimulate discussion

CPD Update editor Cliff Jones outlines an activity designed to help teachers and colleagues to explore their professional needs and gain an early understanding of the kind of impact that might result from addressing those needs

Cliff Jones explores the problematic issues involved in ‘learning from our own professional learning’

Planning for teacher learning has to be a key priority, says David Leat.

Linda Evans suggests how SENCOs can plan and deliver training on subjects which feature prominently in the role of most teaching assistants (TAs).

Many terms and concepts are in the air as the new CPD strategy emerges. Cliff Jones offers some definitions and poses some questions to stimulate discussion, and Ken Jones of the Swansea Institute responds

The TDA’s Futures project brought hundreds of people together to think about the future of education. Mike Newby reports.

Joanna Johnston discusses the implications of exploratory research in schools for teachers, managers and researchers.

The Teacher Learning Academy provides a structure for rigorous professional development. Dr Anne Jasman, policy adviser with the GTCE and her colleague Sara Morgan, head of professional learning, national partnerships and quality, describe the opportunities available.

In 2003, Blackburn with Darwen’s secondary schools decided to apply to become one of the National College for School Leadership’s (NCSL) Networked Learning Communities (NLCs). John Westwell, Des Callaghan, Joanne Emberton and Jenny England describe the background to that decision and how the Leading into Learning NLC has developed into a major force for professional development and improved attainment in Blackburn with Darwen.

Barbara Spender outlines the benefits for students that can come from schools collaborating with each other in a formal partnership where staff give mutual support and share resources

Government initiatives should be accompanied by more training and support, says Geri Skwarek.

Mandy Winters and David Wood of Oxford Brookes University describe how their university is working with Redborne Upper School and Samuel Whitbread Community College in Bedfordshire.

Sean Cavan, head of CPD at Sheffield Hallam University describes some of the approaches to postgraduate study that SHU has developed together with its partners, and the impact they can have on teaching colleagues and their schools.

Working to meet the standards laid down by Investors in People (IIP) is an effective way of raising standards and improving staff morale, argues former head Roger Smith.

Scotland’s Standard for Chartered Teacher has gained international recognition for a programme that has led to a transformation in CPD. Rosa Murray, professional officer (CPD) at the General Teaching Council for Scotland, describes its origins and its effect.

Hayden Llewellyn describes the development of the Chartered Teacher Programme in Wales.

Science teachers are in the vanguard of gaining professional recognition linked to M-level standards. Derek Bell explains.

For Alison Kitson, embarking on a MA meant taking a solitary path, but things have changed since then. She explains the new attitude to one of the most highly regarded forms of CPD.

SENCOs have an important role to play in providing continuing professional development for their colleagues in schools. A recent Ofsted survey lists recommendations for improving practice.

In the second of two articles exploring what helps new teachers feel welcome in a school, teacher Colin Smith looks at how social relations and the delivery of lessons impact on their experience.

Sally Eaton begins a three-part series designed to support managers and leaders who are considering providing some in-house training for their staff.

An effective professional development system is essential for your setting. Steve Mynard explains how to set one up.

Do mistakes and critical professional learning go together? Should we plan for evaluation? Cliff Jones presents a list of questions to encourage reflection.

The Welsh Assembly Government has taken a lead on recognising the individual professional needs of teachers. Gary Brace, chief executive, General Teaching Council for Wales, explains.

The vocational nature of teaching has been eroded by successive government initiatives and we need to take action to preserve it, says Alex Alexandrou, chair of the International Professional Development Asscociation.

Much remains to make the 14-19 vision into reality. Gareth Griffiths, 14-19 provision and attainment director at the Learning and Skills Council looks at progress in developing the diplomas and establishing collaboration between schools, FE colleges and training providers.

Ruth Bradbury explains why it is vital to create development plans for support staff in schools, and outlines a range of practical measures to make the process more manageable in your own school.

Teacher Colin Smith, supported by fellow teacher/researchers seconded to a TLRP-funded project looking at the early professional learning (EPL) of teachers, reports on findings on what helps new teachers feel welcome in a school.

Sara Bubb of the Institute of Education in London discusses the implications of research into adult learning for their professional development.

Teacher and group facilitator Celia Baly describes the challenge of getting out of the way so that children and young people can talk about how emotions affect their experience.

Forthcoming changes will require education professionals to engage with and influence policy. Cliff Jones presents a framework to help CPD leaders develop a comprehensive approach to these challenges.

Judy Durrant and John Bartholomew of Canterbury Christ Church University describe developments that are leading to real and sustainable improvements in CPD and pupil’s learning.

Using NPSLBA to transform behaviour and raise attendance.

With closer cooperation between schools and FE colleges in 14-19 education on the horizon, Lee Davies provides an overview of recent changes to CPD for teachers in further education.

Lisa Crosswood describes the benefits of a modular Masters degree in Education.

Publishing research is an excellent form of professional development says Stephen Merrill.

In answer to concerns about a lack of strategic leadership in CPD, Vivienne Porritt, CPD consultant to the London Challenge, describes how a regional framework for CPD is being built in the capital.

Sally Eaton examines the benefits of CPD and the line manager’s role in implementing it.

Neil Short looks at the second and third stages of the PM cycle: monitoring and review.

Former headmaster Neil Short examines the first stage of the PM cycle – planning.

Communication is by its very nature a two-way process. Children need to have these skills if they are to particpate in shared and meaningful communications. In this Inset package, based on the need for effective communication and engagement as described in the Common Core, Roger Hurn provides information and activities to help your staff think about ways of helping children to practise and develop their communication skills.

Pauline Cox explains what was involved in taking part in the Effective Early Learning (EEL) Project.

The Effective Early Learning (EEL) Project, aims to improve the quality of children’s learning in early years settings. Pauline Cox explains the project’s aims.

In her second article on training, Sally Eaton looks at some everyday opportunities.

Dr Hugh Starkey discusses two pilot CPD courses, part of a new DfES initiative on citizenship.

Cynthia Jones argues that active internationalism is an essential part of CPD for citizenship.

Petra Luck describes the benefits of learning alongside colleagues from around Europe.

Careful planning and clear outcomes made for a successful citizenship INSET event.

The Common Assessment Framework (CAF) and Lead Professional (LP) work are key elements in the Every Child Matters: Change for Children programme. This evaluation of authorities trialling the new approach will be of interest to SENCOs who will become increasingly engaged as the national roll-out continues for these processes for multi-agency working.

The Education and Skills Committee report on SEN includes a brief but important analysis of the role of the SENCO, which highlights a major gap between policy rhetoric and reality.

Planning, preparation and staff INSET for a Black Achievement Festival to coincide with Black History Month.

An INSET session on ‘the global dimension in citizenship education’ was run by the Head of Citizenship at Eaton Bank, Congleton in Cheshire.

This project has shown how some ‘blockages’ to greater global awareness in schools can be unblocked. The challenge now is to share and learn from our experiences. By Sandy Betlem, NEAD.

Do you subscribe to the notion that: ‘There is no such thing as failure – only feedback’, so that whatever mistakes we make, we’re left with the new learning that has emerged?

When setting out classroom rules and telling students what you expect of them, do you ever consider turning this round and asking students what they expect of their teacher?

Jo Lewis describes some active games and motivational techniques.

You left the meeting with a sense of excitement about all those excellent ideas. Yes, some of them are really unusual, and they could work! They’d make a difference. Optimism exists! Three months later… nothing. Did the meeting really happen? Why isn’t anyone talking about it? What happened? Rob Sheffield’s final article in a series of 3 looks at the final stage of problem-solving. How can we implement ideas for change so they gain acceptance from others and improve our lives at work?

How can we take positive steps to ensure that colleagues feel valued,their skills acknowledged and their personal qualities appreciated?

A fading tan isn’t all that remains of Rosemary Cairn’s CPD experiences in the Caribbean!

Getting that new job is terribly exciting. The adrenalin rushes as you realise you are the chosen one and gives a great buzz from the day the news breaks… and for some time afterward.

It often takes time to sort out problems that have arisen over the lunch break and to re-establish a learning environment. How can we reduce the hassle and get the learning in the classroom back on track more quickly after lunch?

Rob Sheffield examines three techniques to help your team explore problems.

Many teachers who have gone through the Critical Skills Programme (CSP) have declared it has changed the way they teach forever. Why does the programme raise such enthusiasm? Colin Weatherley, manager of CSP in Scotland, looks at its development and explains its strengths.

Recording your learning experiences can provide fresh insights. Kelly Christey of Westlands School, Sittingbourne, describes the initial problems and subsequent benefits of keeping such a journal and her tutor, Kit Field of Canterbury Christ Church University, explains why his students on the MA in Leadership and Management for Learning are asked to keep them.

The title of this resource bank might mislead leaders of CPD into thinking that there is little in it for them. This would be a mistake. Although it is focused upon teacher education it is also a treasure trove for anybody interested professional learning.

CPD Update has often pointed out that the further implementation of changes to 14-19 education will create demand for professional learning. We have also made the point, reflected in the recent legislation, that, in order to respond effectively to these changes, schools, together and separately, will have to work with FE colleges. This means collaborative professional learning across a number of boundaries.

Alison Fox looks at the social constructivist underpinnings of CSP and explains how she put the theory into practice in her postgraduate work with teachers in Scotland.

Since the Training and Development Agency (TDA) acquired responsibility for CPD it has been systematically setting about finding out how continuing professional development in schools can operate in order to take forward government policy.

The Training and Development Agency (TDA) is inviting applications for funds to support postgraduate professional development (PPD) programmes.

The role of self-review is gaining in importance. Cliff Jones considers why teachers need to look at their own practice and presents a useful tool for critical professional learning.

How can all the different initiatives, programmes and requirements be linked up to support the professional learning of your colleagues? Cliff Jones takes a look at some of the components.

Cliff Jones analyses the new draft guidelines for performance management.

We look at a CPD plan that links professional development to a system of accreditation.

“During a simple 10 minute walk, it is amazing how ideas can be generated, solutions explored and areas discussed openly, effectively and with a great use of time that invigorates the body and mind”.

Jonathon Fletcher, an assistant head at Isleworth and Syon school, looks at staff attitudes to Teachers’ TV and ways of using this resource for CPD.

Jim Christophers and Chris Bryan of the college of St Mark and St John examine the problems of assessing impact and present a model that takes account of the individual and the wider community.

The Critical Advisory Support Partnership for CPD (CASP) was formally launched at a meeting attended by representatives of three key stakeholder associations on 10 May.

Last month we reported the establishment of chartered science teacher status, a new professional qualification for science education professionals developed by the Association for Science Education (ASE).

Kit Field, the chair of the CPD Committee of the Universities Council for the Education of Teachers (UCET) looks at the revised national standards from the point of view of CPD.

A recent review of the impact of networks of at least three schools has found evidence that networks can be ‘an effective vehicle for improving teaching, learning and attainment’.

Richard Jenkin and Alan Tucker present accounts of the impact of postgraduate professional development (PPD) on learning and teaching gathered from schools across Cornwall.

How can school leaders and managers create an environment in which highly effective work can take place at all levels and all times? Former deputy head John Jackson suggests an approach.

Increased involvement with the FE sector in 14-19 education will have an impact on the way schools organise their CPD. CPD Update looks at the latest proposals for CPD in the tertiary sector.

On 1 April, the National Remodelling Team (NRT) formally merged with the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA). Former NRT director Dame Pat Collarbone will lead the new development directorate as executive director. The development directorate will continue the NRT’s work.

Following the review of the national standards (see opposite), the secretary of state for education and skills has asked the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA) to review the initial teacher training (ITT) requirements.

The Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA) delivered its revised draft of the professional standards for classroom teachers to the secretary of state for education on 7 April, following extensive consultation.

Cliff Jones looks at some useful tools for professional development on the channel’s website.

The Association for Science Education (ASE), in collaboration with the Science Council, offers a professional qualification for science education professionals.

New qualifications for support staff in schools are now being piloted, bringing with them increasing responsibilities for CPD leaders.

As you embark on a mentoring programme in your school, have you considered defining a clear approach to mentoring relationships? The following model of the mentoring process may help you to put all the elements for a successful programme together.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you had a reputation for organising and running meetings that were engaging, fun, productive, and used the talents of the people in the team? Maybe you do already…

Headteacher Anne Clarke reports on an international headteacher placement (IHP) to Akron, Ohio, which she facilitated on behalf of the British Council and the National College for School Leadership (NCSL).

Richard Bird, legal consultant to the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), looks at the advantages currently enjoyed by schools with foundation status and ponders where they fit into the government’s vision for the future.

Graham Osborne , former head and now HIP and NCSL consultant, presents an insight into the Headship Induction Programme through a case study of a recent mentee.

Effective teams are key to raising standards argues Pat Barnes, education consultant and former headteacher.

Peter Kent, headteacher of Lawrence Sheriff School, Rugby, and his deputy Annabel Kay, describe how a new model of ‘professional friendship’ has reaped dividends at their school.

From inclusion to ethics, CPD Update looks at twelve essential headings for a CPD policy.

CPD Update analyses a document giving the direction of policy for the next three years.

New strategy for people development
The school workforce development board (SWDB) has published a three-year strategy, Developing People to Support Learning: a Skills Strategy for the Wider School Workforce 2006-09.

This successful teacher exchange scheme in the West Midlands provides high-impact, low-cost collaborative CPD, as Maggie Langdale explains.

Although much of the publicity surrounding the Education and Inspections Bill now before parliament has focused upon admissions, trust and foundation status, the powers of local authorities and the position of parents, the bill also brings together a number of initiatives and developments that have slowly been taking place for the last two years that have direct implications for CPD.

The Teacher Support Network has set up an online advice, information and support service for teachers. This will supplement the existing telephone service, which offers counselling to around 17,000 teachers and lecturers every year.

The Real Trust is run by schools for schools and has gained Leading Aspect Award Status for continuing professional development and collaborative working. CPD Update looks at its work.

Paul Mangnall (deputy principal) and Richard Stakes (staff development coordinator) of the City of Stoke-on-Trent Sixth Form College discuss adopting and working to the revised standard.

Now that the consultation period on the new national standards has closed and their coming importance has been underlined in the TDA’s report to Ruth Kelly, CPD leaders need to build a picture of how they might become part of a school’s CPD policy. Cliff Jones raises some questions.

However well planned for, the process of moving from trainee to professional will always constitute a big change.

Soile Pietikäinen and Peter Winbourne of London South Bank University reveal how participant voice and reflexive learning in a school-based MA are contributing to positive impact.

Cliff Jones sets out a plan for work-based learning that could be used for MA accreditation.

Answering our list of questions could help you to define your role as CPD coordinator.

In the October issue of CPD Update we published a version of the bridging assignment designed to convert work done on NPQH into Masters level credit.

The evaluation of the trials of the New Relationship with Schools (NRwS) has now been published. The trial involved 93 schools in eight local authorities.

Ten questions to ask yourself about your CPD policy and your performance as leader of CPD so far this year.

Lorne Charles, who teaches at Morpeth School Bethnal Green, was one of the first NQTs to join the GTCE’s Teacher Learning Academy (TLA). She describes how her involvement has helped her to develop professionally and the value of the TLA’s support at this moment in her career.

Shaun Allison, assistant headteacher at Littlehampton Community School (LCS), explains a variety of ways to cross-pollinate in-house skills and expertise to meet each teacher’s training needs.

A deputy head and a vice-principal describe the new perspectives they have gained from working in different organisations through a scheme run by Headteachers and Industry (HTI).

One of the most significant events affecting CPD over the next year will be the revised national standards.

Cliff Jones guides CPD leaders/coordinators on how to add value for aspiring heads.

This report was compiled by Richard Jenkin who works with Padstow School on behalf of the College of St Mark and St John.

Speaking at a fringe meeting at the Labour Party conference in Brighton Carol Adams, chief executive of the General Teaching Council for England (GTCE), set out her thinking on assessment and testing.

Walsall assistant heads Mike Swan and Keith Sydenham report on a secondment activity.

In a letter to the DfES in May Universities Council for Education of Teachers (UCET) expressed concern that teachers working in city academies do not need to be members of the General Teaching Council (GTC).

Government plans to enlarge Ofsted in order to create a single inspectorate that will include all of the services for both children and learners.

Julie Bennett examines the ways in which SWOT analysis can be used with your pupils for brainstorming and exploring projects, ideas, change and decisions.

Peter Hook explains the connection between malnourished children in Vietnam, a sorcerer in Mali and your school’s performance.

Dorothy Nesbit examines the complex relationship between being able to ask for support, but also knowing when to say ‘yes’ or ‘no’ when someone asks you to do something.

Mike Munro Turner works with clients to help them become more effective leaders, exploring their identity as leaders

Do schools need to give more opportunities for teachers to realise their potential? Do teachers need to grasp the chance of becoming passionate lifelong learners in their workplaces as well as in their personal lives? Bill Lucas considers the options.

Speed-reading is not going to change your life, but it will help to ease the conflicts of time in your day-to-day school life, writes Clare Forrest

This evaluation of four approaches used in the Primary Behaviour and Attendance pilot study is relevant to the work of SENCOs involved in helping pupils with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. It also identifies management issues pertinent to SENCOs involved in supporting similar whole-school initiatives.

More people are working in schools than ever before, including almost half a million support staff. Support staff who are well trained, fairly rewarded, and clear about their distinctive contribution, can be instrumental in the work of raising standards and enriching the lives of children.

This is an excellent introductory text to special educational needs and inclusion. It is aimed at trainee teachers and addresses relevant Professional Standards for QTS, but is certainly not constrained by these. The book is organised around three key themes of: principles and policies of special educational needs; working with others; and practical applications in the primary classroom.

John Liddle, head of services to education, AbilityNet East, challenges readers to think anew about the effective use of technology to support children with special educational needs and how this has implications for the role of learning support assistants.

SWOT is a frequently used management tool, useful for reflection, decision-making and appraising options

Graham Guest provides an introduction to the basics of continuing professional development in schools

Important: Before you begin to read this article, make a note of the time you begin and note it again when you finish.

If you are disorganised your colleagues will think you’re less effective, even if you aren’t. Unfair but true. Prioritised lists and well-planned lessons disperse the illusion of chaos, but what else can you do?

Gillian Burn was first introduced to Mind Mapping over 20 years ago while learning to be a midwife. “A very astute tutor introduced me to the concepts of Mind Mapping and I continued to create Mind Maps of my whole midwifery course. Once in my exam, I found I was able to ‘see’ my Mind Maps in my minds eye to answer the exam questions – they help even when delivering babies!”

Clare Smale and Andrew Gibbons consider how mentoring encourages the development of a learning organisation culture

The teaching profession needs to hang on to more of its bright newly qualified teachers (NQTs), as well as to ensure that all staff remain motivated and committed to their careers. Headteacher Anne Clarke outlines how it’s done.

Fundraising for school activities is nothing new. Only now with the pressures of workforce reform and initiatives such as extended schools and specialist status, many schools are reviewing the way they have to raise funds.

In this article Cliff Jones looks particularly at the part that the General Teaching Council for England is beginning to play in encouraging professionally significant research.

GTCE chief executive calls for new approach to testing.

Establishing partnered, networked, or collaborative CPD provision is not always easy, and it can be expensive – but CPD Update gives some tips for success.

The secretary of state for education and skills, Ruth Kelly, has announced to the Labour Party Conference that government has agreed that in city academies ‘as with other schools, all teachers will be registered with the General Teaching Council because those children deserve the best’.

CPD Update takes a look at the SEF: the self-evaluation form (secondary version).

Walsall assistant heads Mike Swan and Keith Sydenham report on a secondment activity.

In a letter to the DfES in May Universities Council for Education of Teachers (UCET) expressed concern that teachers working in city academies do not need to be members of the General Teaching Council (GTC).

In a letter to the DfES in May Universities Council for Education of Teachers (UCET) expressed concern that teachers working in city academies do not need to be members of the General Teaching Council (GTC).

Cliff Jones looks at the principles involved.

Single inspectorate for children and learners.

Quality standards are the new buzzwords in school self-evaluation for G&T coordinators. But what’s the difference between an audit and self-evaluation – and how do you do it? Jane West explains.

Rina Barkol shows the importance of mentoring for women’s careers through her case study of Nira, an Israeli principal, who inspired a dozen teachers to become independent principals.

Category: