Have you taken ownership of your curriculum yet? David Morley examines how to break free, particularly with themed creative events

Staff at the Grammar School for Girls, Wilmington, decided it was time for a change. Six months later there is a real sense of staff and students working together for the future. Chris Love describes how learning to learn was introduced to his school

If the spirit of creativity were allowed to flower, could we cope? David Leat looks at the way that everyday constraints leave schools ill-equipped to teach creativity and the way that it can flourish when those constraints are removed

Improving your gifted and talented provision depends on being able to pinpoint strengths and weaknesses in your current approach. The Institutional Quality Standards (IQS) is a self-evaluation tool for doing just that, and supports the introduction of personalised education across the whole school, writes Deborah Eyre

Angela Youngman looks at some innovative ideas to get children moving

The advantages of being part of a local authority where all schools have specialist status are enormous, as education writer Crispin Andrews found out when he spoke to headteachers in one of them – Plymouth

What are the legal restrictions on how we should teach religious studies in school?

Guy Claxton invites debate on his eight character strengths and virtues for the learning age

David Leat considers a recent study comparing nine countries which shows that policy on teaching and curriculum tends to swing between centralisation and decentralisation

Sal McKeown looks at some of the implications of the renewed primary Framework for those working with children with special educational needs

Helen Boyle, AST and lead teacher for Opening Minds, Campion School, describes the school’s successful development of a competency based curriculum with L2L at its heart

Jackie Beere looks at how schools can help learners to become self motivated and independent

Steve Mynard, editor of Primary Headship, urges us to make reading our biggest priority

Philip Jenkins, a P6 teacher from Dunvant Primary School in Swansea, started using Philosophy for Children and became determined to get as many of his fellow teachers involved as possible

In 2003, Le Rocquier school had no ICT strategy, no ICT replacement programme, no staff ICT training programme…but by 2007 that had all changed, and ICT is now integral to teaching and learning throughout the school, writes John McGuinness

Chris Comber from Leicester University offers curriculum managers exclusive insights into the findings, outlining key factors to integrate ICT throughout teaching and learning

Kath Donovan looks at the Renewed Primary Framework for Mathematics

Sara Wernham looks at the Renewed Primary Framework for Literacy and discovers how it will affect teachers

Lorraine Barber, a numeracy adviser from Worcestershire, explains the importance of effective and exciting maths teaching

Crichton Casbon, curriculum adviser for PE at the QCA, explains the new PE curriculum changes to Penny Cottee

Dance specialist and SSCo Kim Spiller offers advice to primary teachers about delivering high-quality dance

Crispin Andrews talks to assistant headteacher Karen Collinswood about the role of school leadership in developing high-quality PE in primary schools

Tina Ryan explores the reinvention of boxing as a school sport

Andrew Cushing argues the case for a new programme of physical education in schools

Early Years Update highlights the key management issues contained in the EYFS Statutory Framework

Mo Laycock, Headteacher, Firth Park Community Arts College describes the effective model of governance which has contributed to three Ofsted results of ‘outstanding’ leadership at the school

Rather than see governors as a nuisance to be endured, schools instead should be working with them as an invaluable source of help and advice, argues Colleen Arnold of the National Governors Association

A recent research review reveals exactly what pupils want from the curriculum

Education writer and former head Gerald Haigh talks to Dr Keith Bothamley, deputy head (curriculum) at Horsforth School, and Richard Brown, principal of Minsthorpe Community College in Wakefield, about the new KS3 curriculum

Primary headteacher David Dixon applauds many of the changes that the Key Stage 3 review heralds, arguing that many of them will bring about practices already embedded in the best primary schools

History can help young people to see the ‘big picture’ about enslavement, says E Kay Traille

Roger Whittall, Headteacher, The Westwood School, Coventry explains the school improvement strategies that have raised attainment and standards at his school

Many of your teachers will not be science specialists. Angela Youngman has been looking at innovative approaches to the teaching of science that help encourage children’s inquisitiveness

Brian Rossiter, headteacher of Valley School, Worksop, North Nottinghamshire, offers his take on the KS3 curriculum review

Georghia Ellinas, Secondary National Strategy regional adviser, describes an initiative that allows pupils to enjoy a Shakespeare play in their own time and space

In 2002 Gwen Goodhew was dismayed at the lack of resources she found for young linguists. Five years later, her research has revealed changes for the better.

Restructuring the curriculum can enhance personalised learning, risk taking, creativity and Key Stage 3 and 4 results, as Mo Laycock, Headteacher, Firth Park Community Arts College, reports

Empowering young people throughout the Commonwealth to become active citizens is one of the goals of the Council for Education in the Commonwealth. Gertrude Shotte reports on its work

Incorporating more creativity in your curriculum will take staff out of their comfort zones, but will pay dividends in raised motivation and achievement for students, writes Becky Swain

Students in St Margaret’s High School in Liverpool have designed and successfully marketed a computer game. David Dennison and Les Hankin report on a striking demonstration on economic wellbeing as a diver of school activity

Following the publication of Lord Dearing’s recommendations Angela Youngman explores the implications of every KS2 child learning a modern foreign language

Steve Paget explains how logovisual thinking (LVT) can stimulate higher-order thinking

The National Assembly elections on May 3 2007 marked the completion of the second four-year term of devolved government in Wales. Allan Tait presents some of the key issues facing school governors in Wales

Collaboration is growing in 14-19 G&T education. Sandra Howard and Lis Stock of the Gifted and Talented Education Unit at the DfES look at some recent developments

A detailed look at how the IB has been launched in one school, by Rob Ford, Head of International Education and International Baccalaureate, The Ridings High School, Bristol

An outline of the content of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme and what schools need to consider when deciding to apply to deliver the curriculum it offers. By Tristian Stobie

Practitioners need to consider the way that space and resources can be used to encourage children’s investigations. Pat Brunton and Linda Thornton explain

As the world in which we live comes closer together in some ways and further apart in many, Margaret Collins suggests ways in which we in schools can help to make it a better place

The contribution of students as researchers (STARS) to students’ learning and to school development can have numerous benefits. David Lucas and Dr Margaret Wood recount their experience at Deptford Green secondary school

Diversity and Citizenship in the Curriculum: Research Review is a recent DfES research briefing that looks at the way in which citizenship and diversity is taught across the curriculum.

Julia Frankl argues that studying the abolition of slavery challenges discrimination

Daniel Raven-Ellison shows how geographical thinking makes sense of the world

Anjana Khatwa explores the implications of acquiring World Heritage Site status

Mike Rathbone reports on developments to make every child’s music matter

Emotional Literacy Update takes a look at the learning aims that the secondary curriculum review hopes to put at the centre of the KS3 and KS4 curriculum from autumn 2008.

‘Community cohesion’ is now a legal obligation on school governors and we must make the best of it, says Richard Bird, former headteacher and now legal consultant to the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL). He asks how teaching of history could contribute to this objective.

Celine West shows how head spanners and glass eyes can be used to unpack prejudice.

Heather Osborne describes how PSHE and performing arts can be used to promote peace education.

A new curriculum-based website to promote awareness of meningitis is outlined by Caroline Hill.

Neil Hawkes outlines a values-based approach to school improvement.

Headteachers Anne Clarke and Annabelle Guyver analyse the benefits that trips abroad bring to participating pupils and to the staff leading them.

At the end of last year Sir Ron Dearing’s interim Languages Review was published. Headteacher Jim Donnelly looks at what he had to say and the suggestions for a way forward.

How can personalisation work in practice? Headteacher Paula Allen spoke to Bob Cox to explain how it’s done at Dorney Combined School.

The DfES, QCA and the National Strategies have got plans for changes to teaching and learning. Is this news? We have learned to live with change.

Learners tend to have a narrow view of the relevance of the curriculum and their enjoyment of it decreases across the key stages. These are two of the key findings of an NfER review of the research on pupils’ experiences of and perspectives on the curriculum published in the UK between 1989 and 2005.

A school with creativity at the heart of the learning process will benefit by increasing the motivation of staff and pupils, says former head, Dave Weston. In this article and case study, he shows the way to more imaginative approaches to curriculum planning.

Richard Ennals looks at the ongoing work to bring internationalism into schools and colleges.

A second report from the Music Manifesto group has recommended a series of steps to improve music education at maintained schools in England

How can you help G&T pupils develop strategies for thinking about their work before rushing in? Peter Levin offers some solutions.

The key change to the curriculum at Key Stage 4 has been to increase the breadth of choice. Alan Monks, Deputy Headteacher, describes the impact on Ellis Guilford School and Sports College, Nottingham.

Sarah Blenkinsop and Marian Morris examine young people’s decision-making patterns, the role their school plays, the skills they require and other influences on the choices they make at core points in their school career.

Richard Bird, former headteacher and now legal consultant to the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), looks at the different interpretations of personalised learning and what they might mean in practice.

Peter Wynne-Willson urges settings to bring live theatre to their children.

Dr Barbara Spender, Freelance Writer and Researcher, with information supplied by Terry Smith, Assistant Headteacher, Ninestiles Secondary School, Acocks Green, Birmingham.

Dr Barbara Spender considers the key questions underpinning Every Child Matters implementation from first considerations about individual school priorities, through visibility in specific curriculum areas, to evaluation and measurement of success.

G&T coordinator Peter Leyland explains how one Luton primary school has found that this thinking technique benefits everybody – students, more-able students and even staff.

Neil Short reports on the result of a small survey into sports provision in schools.

If giftedness is expertise in development then gifted historians are, or should be, on the road to being masters of a discipline. But how do we identify and nurture gifted historians? Alison Rowan explains the role of NAGTY’s history think tank.

Geography can reward the inquisitiveness of young children, says Steve Mynard.

Helen Hann considers how we can support children and nurture their emerging mathematical concepts and understanding.

Steve Mynard looks at the place of drama in your setting and how existing practice can be enhanced.

Angela Youngman finds out what is possible if you want to introduce a modern foreign language in your setting.

Dr Alison J Price of Oxford Brookes University explains why understanding the relationship between numbers, and the connections between calculations, is an important part of developing mathematical awareness, and how this can influence delivery of the curriculum.

In his regular column Dr Graham Haydon argues that when the principles of justice and care are combined a more beneficial outcome is likely to be achieved.

In a special feature which encourages informed and responsible ways of tackling abuses of power Dr Christopher Williams suggests that young people make use of new web resources.

Don Harrison describes three ways to explore issues of global poverty through a new resource from Save the Children.

Jacek Brant found that taxation was an unattractive subject for pupils. He describes the findings of his team’s research and a practical resource that was developed in response to it.

John Potter says citizenship gives education meaning and purpose – and students seem to agree.

A new study guide by Quakers makes a valuable contribution to peace, finds Brian Walker.

Dr Anjana Khatwa and Richard Edmonds raise questions about fossil collecting and how to maintain environments for a sustainable future.

Alice Mayers describes a collaborative project between the Foundling Museum and the National Theatre.

Karen Garvin of ActionAid explains how the My Friend Needs A Teacher initiative helps students learn that they have the power to make the world a better place.

Lucy Marcovitch shows how progression and achievement in PSHE can be recognised, demonstrated and celebrated at all key stages.

Post-16 education for G&T pupils is disjointed and ill-supported. Mike Bulmer explains what needs to change.

Cynthia Jones argues that active internationalism is an essential part of CPD for citizenship.

Ruth Wilkes and Geoff Roberts describe a series of popular events in French and German.

This scheme of work has the theme of Rich World Poor World.

Questions for whole-school change – A suggested planning framework for providing citizenship education with a global dimension.

Global citizenship benchmarks for secondary schools.

This project focused on integrating Fair Trade purchasing throughout the school and raising pupil and staff awareness of global issues.

Headteacher Peter Kent and deputy Annabel Kay describe how introducing a condensed KS3 programme in their school has created the opportunity for personalised learning.

Dr John Hopkin, chair of the Geographical Association’s Education Committee, looks at why geography has lost its status in the subject league tables and the ways in which it can be put back on the school map.

Former head Dave Weston describes how links with a Finnish school paid dividends for his staff and pupils and led to further similar initiatives.

Geography is the poor Cinderella of the primary curriculum. Where did it all go wrong and what can be done about it? Paula Richardson, education adviser and chair of the publications board of the Geographical Association, makes some suggestions.

Former head Roger Smith looks at ways of promoting creativity in schools, arguing that the concept needs to have its place at the centre of the curriculum.

Neil Short, education consultant and former head, looks at how schools are facing up to the challenge of supporting and developing sporting talent among young pupils.

The aim of this project was, ‘for students to understand the effect of global economics on countries with significant debt’. Specifically, how consumer pressure can ease the burden on developing nations.

Citizenship education is being integrated into curriculum planning across the UK. The following ‘steps to success’ come from Norfolk LEA, which worked with Norfolk and Suffolk schools on the Developing Citizenship project.

This project has shown how some ‘blockages’ to greater global awareness in schools can be unblocked. The challenge now is to share and learn from our experiences. By Sandy Betlem, NEAD.

Our theme was ‘Rich World, Poor World’. How do we open the eyes of children to equality issues?

This project supports the National Framework for PSHE and the National Healthy School Standard, as well as supporting the development of Citizenship throughout the school with some 1400 pupils.

Our Global Citizenship days are off-timetable events with a mixture of quizzes, activities, video, and seminars. They are designed to cater for approximately half a year group at a time (110 students).

The Trading Game is part of a proactive approach towards Citizenship, including a new Citizenship department and a Human Rights group.

Our multi-cultural arts day was aimed at Year 7 students and was one of a programme of stop days around global citizenship in our school.

Many schools would say their students have a voice, but do they really? What about at Whalley Range?

Kato Cruwys Harris explains how teachers can make geography more relevant to society and young people, by incorporating citizenship.

Charitable trusts give more than £350m to education annually. Louise Germaney looks at some of the biggest grant-giving foundations.

Leslie Spencer takes us on her learning journey, inspiring learners to love learning. Are you prepared to have your preconceptions, philosophies and pedagogy challenged? A teacher’s tale of the ‘Opening Minds’ curriculum.

The Association for Science Education (ASE), in collaboration with the Science Council, offers a professional qualification for science education professionals.

Tim Lomas, principal adviser, CfBT/Lincolnshire School Improvement Service, looks at ways of continuing to improve the profile and teaching of history in schools.

Enterprise education has entered the Ofsted schedule as a subject to be inspected in all schools. But do you know exactly what it involves?

Students are responding positively to the RSA’s Opening Minds initiative with improvements in motivation, confidence and attitudes. Teachers are also reaping the benefits. RSA Head of Education Lesley James brings you up to date with developments and new resources.

An implementation plan for the government’s reform of 14-19 education has been published.

Since 2001, when in the words of our Head Teacher, Patrick Hazlewood, we were to ‘…throw out the National Curriculum…’, our school has focussed on discovering how we might best serve our students in order to make them independent, adaptable and confident learners able to meet the demands of the 21st century.

Latin is a highly valued part of the curriculum at Benton Park School. Principal Anne Clarke explains why.

With around 95% of state schools no longer offering Latin, access is the critical issue for survival of the subject. Will Griffiths, director of the Cambridge School Classics Project (CSCP), looks at a DfES initiative to address this and highlights the competitive advantage that offering Latin can give schools.

School sport partnerships are continuing to be successful in increasing the amount of time pupils spend taking part in PE and sport.

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