A project aimed at raising the profile of plenaries at Sandringham School, St Albans, has evolved into a catalyst for change that allows students to make their voices heard in the school. Deputy head Ceddy de la Croix explains

Three years after they first started practising Philosophy for Children, Year 6 children, one parent and two of their teachers recorded what the experience had meant for them. We publish below an edited excerpt from the resulting DVD

Natassja Cole gives her verdict on the pros and cons of being on the G&T register

Mandi Horwood describes how a project to investigate how students saw their learning and how they can have a say in it revealed the vital contribution that they have to make

How can we get primary-aged children to give us feedback about their classroom experiences? Iwona Glowacz used the prospect of getting published as a way of collecting pupils’ thoughts

Headteacher Neil Berry explains how Brampton Manor in East London – described by Ofsted in December 1999 as having ‘serious weaknesses’ – was turned into the fully inclusive, successful school it is today

David Gimson describes how cross-curricular observation helped teachers to develop more effective questioning techniques – and also led to them asking their own questions about the G&T ‘label’

Some people think that children under five are too young to express opinions, but Sara Bryson and her colleagues found ways of ensuring that babies and children were at the heart of the decision-making process

Canvassing pupils’ views can inform their learning as well as our teaching – as Paul Ainsworth discovered when he asked one of his classes to comment on his marking

A recent research review reveals exactly what pupils want from the curriculum

Barry Griffiths summarises key points of an online debate about family relationships

Lois Canessa describes how she actively involved students in setting up a school council

Listening to what students themselves have to say about their education is an important part of high-quality G&T provision. Year 8 pupil, Beth Hancox outlines her thoughts on the qualities of a good teacher for gifted and talented students

Teacher and trainer Michelle McGrath argues that the emphasis on students as partners in their learning is a fundamental challenge to the current model of teaching and will require significant shifts in attitudes at all levels in schools

Raising Achievement Update looks at a book that describes practical ways of meeting the challenges of implementing circle time in secondary schools and why it can be so valuable

Lois Canessa describes how she actively involved students in setting up a school council

Yeading Junior in Hayes has evolved its strategy for putting emotional health and wellbeing at the centre of the curriculum. Headteacher Carole Jones describes how

In the first episode of her diary, drama teacher Julie Leoni writes about reconciling her emotional literacy programme with the school’s focus on targets and achievement.

The contribution of students as researchers (STARS) to students’ learning and to school development can have numerous benefits. David Lucas and Dr Margaret Wood recount their experience at Deptford Green secondary school

The EPPI website is an excellent resource for informing your decision making, says David Leat.

Staff soon discovered that it was more than just a ‘learning to learn’ scheme. Liz Solomon describes the challenges and insights gained from trialling Thinking Through School.

Julie Leoni describes how she tried to do justice to the voices of young people in her presentation to the Antidote conference.

In this article, Christopher Williams unpacks recent DfES guidance on student involvement.

Antidote director James Park and development director Marilyn Tew describe the challenge that schools face if they are to address a decline in student wellbeing between Years 5 and 10.

Do students have something constructive to say about their own education? Putting pupil consultation at the forefront of her research into tacking underachievement allowed Helen Lee to highlight some new areas of concern for her school.

Matthew Savage, assistant headteacher, George Mitchell Community School, and Dr Margaret Wood, senior lecturer, York St John University College, explore the role of student voice in evaluating and then improving the learning experience of students in the classroom.

G&T adviser Linda Hodgson describes how her cluster has developed a way of listening to and responding to pupils’ perceptions of school.

In his regular column, Dr Graham Haydon argues that, despite appearances, PSHE as well as citizenship has a role in education for democracy.

Networking to engage student voice

Legal case notes: Re: R (Residence: Shared Care: Children’s Views) [2006] 1 FLR 491, CA

The Special Educational Needs Regional Partnerships (SEN RPs) have made a substantial and marked contribution to the government’s agenda regarding provision for pupils with SEN, according to a report* from the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER).

Researchers based at the University of Bristol are examining the support for children with complex communication needs – in both mainstream and special schools – to express their views and make decisions for themselves.

Young people discuss bullying, citizenship, fair trade and social responsibility. Friday 25th February 2005 – transcript.

To mark Martin Luther King day, students wrote poems on social responsibility themes.

On Martin Luther King Day, suggestions from Year 8 and 9 students at Benjamin Britten High School.

UNICEF UK’s whole school change initiative the ‘Rights Respecting School Award’, has been informed by the Developing Citizenship project, as Heather Jarvis from UNICEF UK explains.

The Trading Game is part of a proactive approach towards Citizenship, including a new Citizenship department and a Human Rights group.

Many schools would say their students have a voice, but do they really? What about at Whalley Range?

Wouldn’t we love to know, to really know, what our students think of their lessons? Yet it’s so hard for us to ask, and so hard for them to answer, that we often don’t try. Thoughtboards are a quick and highly effective way to make feedback fun.

As curriculum managers seek new ways to engage students as partners in learning, a new website that invites pupils to rate their teachers has received mixed reactions.

The government is encouraging primary schools to set up school councils.

We must listen to the pupil voice if pupils are going to feel valued as members of the school community, argues Anne Clarke, Principal of Benton Park School Technology College.

Students enjoy school and are pleased with the education they receive — a welcome message for curriculum managers, and one that flies in the face of common opinion.

One of the hardest jobs in teaching is to differentiate materials and teaching among pupils of differing abilities in the same class. So is grouping by ability right for your school and for your most able pupils? Jane West examines the pros and cons.

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