Robert Sinclair offers some ideas on how to introduce climate change lessons into the primary classroom, as part of the KS2 geography curriculum

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In the Learning Futures project, teachers ‘let go’ of their students’ learning. The results were rich and varied, as the blog entries from participants reveal

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To be successful in school and prepared for life after school, students need to be independent learners. This month’s Case in Point looks at how to develop these skills in classrooms across the school for, as the case study school testifies to, a bolt-on approach is rarely the way to build consistent and comprehensive coverage of independent learning that shows students the relevance of these skills to everyday life, and makes them want to acquire these skills for themselves

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Two Ofsted reports later, and geography and history are back in the news. Suzanne O’Connell asks: will the arrival of the English baccalaureate improve their status, or will their clustering as part of ‘humanities’ be their downfall?

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We cannot be serious all the time: schools need to be exciting stimulating places where people can laugh, have ideas, clash and spark off each other, says David Leat

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A compelling project of personal significance for students can provide fertile ground for learning. Kayte Judge describes a project that took place across two different settings

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Neil Griffiths, creator of Storysacks, reflects on the importance of sharing shares with young children and shows how to make story reading a rich and memorable performance

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Joan Hardy updates readers on her school’s involvement in the silver award of the Arts Council’s Arts Award scheme, which involves them in designing, implementing and evaluating a particular arts challenge

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Asking questions is fundamental to helping students acquire knowledge. Ulrike Thomas looks at four key issues to consider when thinking about questioning

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Recently retired from Firth Park Community Arts College, where she was headteacher from 1995, Mo Laycock explains how engaging with hard-to-reach parents via extended schools strategies contributed towards her school’s transformation

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Student interviewers may not have the same priorities as school leaders but they still have useful insights to share, says Peter Kent

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School councils are becoming more influential in primaries. Neil Short discusses the implications and shares examples of just how far children can go in leading their own learning

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Whose responsibility is it to join up the dots in a subject-based curriculum? asks David Leat

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At Noadswood School, peer mentoring goes beyond pastoral activities. Tim Ennion and Eddie Stephenson describe how they are putting learning-focused peer mentoring into action

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David Leat looks at how schools can make the PLTS framework their own

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Coaching is falling short of its potential but is at its best when it is a two-way process. Rachel Lofthouse and David Leat as they describe the findings of their research

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The new Department for Education demonstrates the unfamiliar look of coalition politics with Liberal Democrat MP Sarah Teather taking on the role of Minister of State for Children and Families under the new Conservative Secretary of State for Education, Michael Gove

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This assembly follows the inspiring story of Wanda Summers − her recovery from a serious accident, and her determination to complete an ultra-marathon across the Gobi desert

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In this assembly, Brian Radcliffe invites students, in light of the Government’s proposed spending cuts, to consider the way they prioritise their time, money and energy

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This assembly begins by considering the numerous apologies which have been made in connection with the football World Cup. It goes on to discuss the difference between a qualified apology and a true expression of regret

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On 11 June this year, the hills around Llanwrtyd Wells in Wales saw the thirtieth Man versus Horse Marathon. The assembly tells the story of the race, and along the way reflects on the long story of the close relationship between humans and horses

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This week’s assembly considers the extent to which we might expect too much of people and reminds us that we’re only human. It challenges listeners to show a little more compassion in their lives

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In this assembly, children will learn about why supporters are important for encouraging sportsmen and women and for sporting events as a whole

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This week’s assembly challenges listeners not to lose sight of the important issues, even when only certain ones seem to be in the public eye

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This assembly discusses being scared when students are lost, and offers advice as to what they should do when they are

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This assembly, coinciding with the start of the World Cup in South Africa, looks back to the sport of chariot racing in ancient Rome. It asks questions about the pros and cons of professional sport – then as now

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This primary assembly looks at personal injury and disappointment, and how to make the most of a bad situation

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In this series looking at ‘effective participators’, in this issue we look at a technique known as the World Café – another form of cooperative investigation that can be used to encourage students to engage actively with the issues that affect them

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Exploring the natural world is a fantastic way to develop and inspire early years. Find out why, and gain practical ideas for how to encourage young children to explore the world of plants

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This week’s assembly challenges listeners to remember those who are left behind in one way or another, and asks listeners to question the extent to which they are inclusive in their thoughts and actions

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In this assembly, children will learn about Doug Gregory – the 87 year old RAF pilot who is still flying and performing stunts. Children will be invited to confront stereotypes about older people

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Wider Family Learning is a cross-cutting strategy to engage reluctant adult learners while involving them more with their children’s learning. Although one in three schools take up Wider Family Learning grants from their local authority, the level of funding available means that many more could successfully apply. Nick Holt takes you step-by-step through an application form

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In this assembly students are encouraged to consider the balance of rivalry and unity that is exemplified by the World Cup

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This assembly looks at the history of the Queen’s Speech and what her latest speech will mean for the UK

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This assembly uses the theme of puns and similar wordplay. It looks at many definitions of the word pun, such as in the form of a corny joke and a way to highlight tragedy, and also explores the idea of the visual pun (the ‘rebus’) with reference to the prisoner Thomas Abel’s carving in the Tower of London

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This week we will look at an approach known as Appreciative Inquiry – another form of cooperative investigation that can be used to encourage students to engage actively with the issues that affect them

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This assembly looks at the importance of technology and wonders where science will take us in the next few decades

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This week’s assembly challenges listeners to imagine a world where we’re all in the same ’team’, and reflect upon how their own actions might start to bring this dream about

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This e-bulletin continues our focus on developing ‘effective participators’. This issue we look at Narrative Enquiry – a form of cooperative investigation that can be used with students, staff, parents, governors to encourage active exploration of the issues that affect them

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As recent political events have shown, sometimes you’re in a position where whatever you choose to do is going to upset someone. This assembly keeps away from the political issue, but presents the dilemma in familiar terms

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A new report has found that well deployed teaching assistants help raise a school’s attainment. David Gordon looks at the details

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Often when we think about using the environment to teach young children, we focus on the natural world and ignore all the wonderful examples that exist around us in the built environment. Early Years Update discusses ways to use the man-made environment around us to develop early years learning

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In this assembly Brian Radcliffe invites students to consider the addictive effects of video games and suggests some relational strategies to address them

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This assembly reflects on spring and memories, using a poem written by A. E. Housman

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This assembly considers the significance of the letter X, which voters use to mark their ballot papers in the general election. Thinking about the many meanings of X can help us to understand ourselves and others

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The assembly helps children to understand that fairness is an intrinsic quality of all sport – that cheating damages the sport as well as taking away from the achievements of the cheat

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This e-bulletin continues our exploration of how the QCDA personal, learning and thinking skills framework can be put into practice. For the summer term, our focus is on the final key competence of the framework: that of ‘effective participators’

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This assembly challenges listeners to think about the rescue services available to us, suggesting that perhaps we take such things for granted especially in more economically developed countries such as our own

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This assembly discusses British citizens stuck abroad due to the volcanic eruption in Iceland and subsequent flight ban

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What do the four main parties (Labour, Conservative, Liberal Democrat and Green) have to say about education?

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