In early years especially, boys should not be forced into a “girl-like” model of learning, explains Steve Mynard

With increasing pressure to deliver personalised learning, John Blanchard offers strategies for putting it into practice where it counts: the classroom

Early years practitioners have used ICT to support young children’s learning in diverse ways, writes Julie Steer

A project aimed at raising the profile of plenaries at Sandringham School, St Albans, has evolved into a catalyst for change that allows students to make their voices heard in the school. Deputy head Ceddy de la Croix explains

Comment-only marking is vital in helping students to reflect on their own learning, but implementing it can be a challenge. Jason Edwards, vice principal at Priory Community School, Somerset, describes how his school has overcome the initial problems

Professor Maurice Galton, from the University of Cambridge, examines the benefits of group work and its possible contribution to improving the current classroom climate

The contribution of support staff to student achievement must be recognised and promoted, says Paul Ainsworth

Jan White provides a range of practical ideas for creating enabling outdoor environments that support young children’s health, wellbeing, development and learning

Miraz Triggs found that random name generation as a way of choosing who would answer questions focused students’ attention and led to a higher level of participation

Antidote’s development director Marilyn Tew describes how schools can encourage learning by promoting ‘CLASI-ness’ – where children feel capable, listened to, accepted, safe and included

Video conferencing is becoming an invaluable tool for many schools, says Angela Youngman

Is it possible to create a more ‘gender balanced’ learning environment? Natalie Griffiths explains how she investigated the effect of gender on learning in the D&T classroom and developed strategies to benefit pupils of both sexes

Crispin Andrews looks at the increasing emphasis on topic-based learning and offers some ideas to teach science through the topic of birds

Trevor Millum outlines a truly novel way to get pupils to enjoy manipulating and using words

Many of your teachers will not be science specialists. Angela Youngman has been looking at innovative approaches to the teaching of science that help encourage children’s inquisitiveness

Listening to what students themselves have to say about their education is an important part of high-quality G&T provision. Year 8 pupil, Beth Hancox outlines her thoughts on the qualities of a good teacher for gifted and talented students

Mark McKergow describes how music can be used at the end of your lessons, as a soundtrack for your students to review their learning

Dealing with cancer in PSHE can promote health and allay fears, says Chris Rushbrook

Graham Haydon argues that it is time to talk about a difficult topic.

Peter Wynne-Willson urges settings to bring live theatre to their children.

Any primary school teachers out there with workshop ideas? I’m organising a few Antarctica mornings for local primaries and I’m trying to work out what to do.

A free training seminar on gambling education will take place in London on 10 May 2007. The seminar is being organised by Tacade, a leading charity working in the field of PSHCE.

British Gymnastics’ play programme helps young children develop physical skills. Jo Prescott and Liz Liebman explain how.

Geography can reward the inquisitiveness of young children, says Steve Mynard.

Archaeologist and teacher John Crossland, describes how you can use an historic site with Foundation Stage children.

Steve Mynard explores a process to enrich your children’s language and literacy experiences.

Margaret Collins looks at ways to raise children’s awareness of sun protection.

Auditory memory is the ability to recall information that has been given orally. The activities listed here can help develop auditory memory and can be incorporated into lessons for the benefit of all pupils.

Visual memory is the ability to recall information that has been presented visually. The activities listed here can help develop visual memory and can be incorporated into a lesson for the benefit of all pupils.

Visual discrimination is the ability to recognise similarities and differences between visual images. The activities listed here can help develop visual discrimination skills and can be used in lessons to benefit all children.

Phonological awareness is the ability to be aware of sounds within words and to be able to break down words into syllables and into phonemes. The activities listed here can help develop phonological awareness and can be used in lessons for the benefit of all children.

Auditory discrimination is the ability to detect similarities and differences when listening to sounds. The activities listed here can be used to strengthen auditory discrimination skills and can be incorporated into a lesson to benefit all children.

Dr Jonothan Neelands, deputy director of research at the National Academy of Gifted and Talented Youth, explains how drama helps both the academically gifted and artistically talented.

Rob Sanderson of Wigan Schools Library Service offers some practical advice for building an early years library.

Dr John Hopkin, chair of the Geographical Association’s Education Committee, looks at why geography has lost its status in the subject league tables and the ways in which it can be put back on the school map.

Geography is the poor Cinderella of the primary curriculum. Where did it all go wrong and what can be done about it? Paula Richardson, education adviser and chair of the publications board of the Geographical Association, makes some suggestions.

Letting children take well considered risks helps to prepare them for danger in the world, argues former head Bob Jelley.

Whether at home or at school, ICT can play a major role in enabling young people to achieve their potential whether or not they have a disability or specific learning difficulties, says Adam Waits, lead assessor (children and young adults) at national computing and disability charity, AbilityNet.

The aim of this project was, ‘for students to understand the effect of global economics on countries with significant debt’. Specifically, how consumer pressure can ease the burden on developing nations.

Our Global Citizenship days are off-timetable events with a mixture of quizzes, activities, video, and seminars. They are designed to cater for approximately half a year group at a time (110 students).

An anti-racism day held in 2002 brought together visiting speakers, specialist workshops, interested staff and visitors from NFC. This became a model for our first global citizenship event.

The Trading Game is part of a proactive approach towards Citizenship, including a new Citizenship department and a Human Rights group.

Our multi-cultural arts day was aimed at Year 7 students and was one of a programme of stop days around global citizenship in our school.

Many schools would say their students have a voice, but do they really? What about at Whalley Range?

The Manifesto for Education Outside the Classroom promotes high-quality outdoor learning experiences to support cognitive skills and aid personal development – gardening fits the bill, says Dr Susan Johnson

What is inside a learner’s head?

The human brain learns best when it has a variety of ways to take in new information. The key is to provide children with a smorgasbord of methods to sample new information, because the brain searches for novelty.

From a selection of teaching tips by Clinton Lamprecht.

Writing frames undoubtedly have their uses, but they can also limit the creative talents of the more able, writes Frank Bruce

Is Your Teaching Meeting Children’s Learning Needs?

Traditionally, teaching used to primarily teach pupils and then test them. The ‘chalk and talk’ methods and ‘auditory modes’ of instruction have now been widely discredited. In fact, one of the main reasons why some schools fail their OFSTED reports is because the conventional teaching methods they adopt do not meet pupils’ learning needs.

13 Lucky Steps to a Personal Learner-Centred Classroom.

If Their Bodies don’t Move their Brains won’t Groove.

In this article, Philip Drury underlines the numerous educational advantages of project work, and shows how negative points can be effectively circumvented

Six steps to teach anything

Accelerated learning tips.

Many schools participate in National Storytelling Week (held in January), organised by the Society for Storytelling. This article describes how traditional stories can help to address difficult emotional issues, and stresses the importance of letting children and young people find their own meanings in the stories that they hear.

Julie Bennett suggests three different techniques that you can use to motivate learners and add further dimensions to your teaching

Win it or lose it within the first three minutes, by Nicola Fahey

Category:
depl678-20