Thinking skills can never be crossed off a teachers ‘to do’ list, argues David Leat. Here he challenges some emerging dogmas about objectives and lesson planning

How can the process of developing thinking skills be put into practice? A glimpse into the environment within a day nursery in south-east England shows how

If the spirit of creativity were allowed to flower, could we cope? David Leat looks at the way that everyday constraints leave schools ill-equipped to teach creativity and the way that it can flourish when those constraints are removed

David Allen and Iona Towler-Evans look at an innovative system of teaching thinking skills through drama

Peter Leyland describes how he used TASC to teach his Year 6 class about measuring time

What if we all looked the same? This was just one of the topics used to get pupils thinking at a competitive event organised by Luton LEA and attended by Peter Leyland

Headteacher Neil Berry explains how Brampton Manor in East London – described by Ofsted in December 1999 as having ‘serious weaknesses’ – was turned into the fully inclusive, successful school it is today

David Leat reflects on the contribution of cognitive acceleration through science education (CASE) and the way in which initiatives such as this can contribute to thinking communities

Everyone seems to be a constructivist these days, but what do people mean by ‘constructivism’ and what are the implications for education?

Kate Wall describes the main findings of the Learning to Learn in Schools Phase 3 project evaluation and looks at some of the implications for schools

Steve Paget explains how logovisual thinking (LVT) can stimulate higher-order thinking

Barry Mapp introduces the capabilities of Mind Mapping and explains some of the features that make it unique

Teaching and learning based around quality talk and taking the whole class forward together is a practical and effective approach. Headteacher Andy Buck explains

In this month’s in-depth focus Anne De A’Echevarria talks about the Thinking Through School approach to learning-focused innovation. She describes the model and, using examples, explores successful implementation in schools and how the impact can be seen to be more than school-wide.

Staff soon discovered that it was more than just a ‘learning to learn’ scheme. Liz Solomon describes the challenges and insights gained from trialling Thinking Through School.

Planning for teacher learning has to be a key priority, says David Leat.

Evidence is emerging in Scotland that links secondary school pupils’ progress and emotional intelligence to the use of philosophical enquiry as a learning approach in primary schools.

Daniel Raven-Ellison shows how geographical thinking makes sense of the world

In his continuing series on gifted thinkers, Charles Dietz looks at the work of Robert Sternberg and how he has influenced the teaching of gifted pupils

Graham Haydon argues that it is time to talk about a difficult topic.

In a second extract from his book, psychologist Steve Killick describes two approaches to engaging young people in problem-solving conversations.

The DfES, QCA and the National Strategies have got plans for changes to teaching and learning. Is this news? We have learned to live with change.

Science teachers are in the vanguard of gaining professional recognition linked to M-level standards. Derek Bell explains.

How can you help G&T pupils develop strategies for thinking about their work before rushing in? Peter Levin offers some solutions.

Teacher and group facilitator Celia Baly describes the challenge of getting out of the way so that children and young people can talk about how emotions affect their experience.

Dr Tracy Packiam Alloway of the University of Durham has researched the difficulties faced by children who have a low working memory.

G&T coordinator Peter Leyland explains how one Luton primary school has found that this thinking technique benefits everybody – students, more-able students and even staff.

If giftedness is expertise in development then gifted historians are, or should be, on the road to being masters of a discipline. But how do we identify and nurture gifted historians? Alison Rowan explains the role of NAGTY’s history think tank.

Helen Hann considers how we can support children and nurture their emerging mathematical concepts and understanding.

In his regular column Dr Graham Haydon argues that when the principles of justice and care are combined a more beneficial outcome is likely to be achieved.

Critical thinking skills can help us unpack national stereotypes. Dr Christopher Williams proposes strategies and resources focusing on the image of young people in Palestine.

Based on his keynote address to the 2006 PSHE and citizenship conference, Dr Christopher Williams discusses the importance of change.

In his regular column, Dr Graham Haydon argues that, despite appearances, PSHE as well as citizenship has a role in education for democracy.

Educational consultant Mike Fleetham shares some interesting ideas about choosing books and looks at some practical ideas for using stories to develop children’s thinking.

Margaret Collins explores ways in which we can help children to think about their responses and their reactions.

Global citizenship benchmarks for secondary schools.

Geography is the poor Cinderella of the primary curriculum. Where did it all go wrong and what can be done about making primary geography teaching higher on the agenda? Paula Richardson makes some suggestions

This article outlines an approach to teaching and learning called LogoVisual Thinking (LVT), which was first introduced into schools in 2000. Although the methods and tools are relatively new to teachers, they are already having a profound influence on those who have been introduced to them. We believe that the approach represents an important advance in the teaching of thinking skills and has broader potential for designing effective learning experiences.

Garry Burnett explains how different types of question can improve thinking skills

Leslie Spencer takes us on her learning journey, inspiring learners to love learning. Are you prepared to have your preconceptions, philosophies and pedagogy challenged? A teacher’s tale of the ‘Opening Minds’ curriculum.

Rob Sheffield examines three techniques to help your team explore problems.

Julie Bennett examines the ways in which SWOT analysis can be used with your pupils for brainstorming and exploring projects, ideas, change and decisions.

On the 250th anniversary of Mozart’s birth, Garry Burnett used the composer as a model to question whether creative skills such as problem-solving and interpretation can be taught

Walking on clouds: how could we engineer the possibility of walking on clouds in the sky?

For the teacher wishing to develop pupils’ thinking skills, there are many books, models and approaches to choose from, each with its own philosophies and strengths, writes Andy Bowman

SWOT is a frequently used management tool, useful for reflection, decision-making and appraising options

Gillian Burn was first introduced to Mind Mapping over 20 years ago while learning to be a midwife. “A very astute tutor introduced me to the concepts of Mind Mapping and I continued to create Mind Maps of my whole midwifery course. Once in my exam, I found I was able to ‘see’ my Mind Maps in my minds eye to answer the exam questions – they help even when delivering babies!”

AL has become something of a catch-all phrase these days, synonymous with brain-based or mind-friendly learning. Susan Norman goes beyond the buzz-word to bring you the facts

Model mapping (or ‘mind mapping’) is a learning tool for pupils of all ages and abilities, as Oliver Caviglioli, co-author of MapWise and former PE teacher, explains

Critical thinking, communication, politics, philosophy, environmental awareness, economics.

John Senior looks at an approach that will help G&T students develop creative thinking.

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