Teaching abroad is no longer seen as a sideways move that could harm career progression. Steve Caulfield of the Alice Smith School, Kuala Lumpar, describes some of the opportunities

Shiraz Chakera, professional networks manager for the GTCE, describes how the Engage Network has supported early career teachers in coping with a major concern – classroom behaviour

Who are the parents who evade all forms of contact from schools and why do they choose to exist at the fringes of their child’s education? Jo McShane investigates

Gross motor skills are the movements of the large muscles of the body. These activities will help to develop and improve gross motor skills.

Pragmatics refers to the ability to communicate in social situations. These classroom activities will help all children to develop social communication skills.

Jo Smith provides some practical tips on how to develop questioning skills as a tool for promoting participation and learning

Ingrid Sutherland outlines controversial new guidance on the provision of sexual health services in schools

Is it possible to create a more ‘gender balanced’ learning environment? Natalie Griffiths explains how she investigated the effect of gender on learning in the D&T classroom and developed strategies to benefit pupils of both sexes

Pam Woolner looks at the variety of ways in which the widely-used term ‘learning environment’ is employed

PE and Sport Today talks to primary link teacher Lorraine Livingstone who, despite the inadequacies of PE training for primary teachers, has become something of a specialist

Mary James, the Teaching and Learning Research Project (TLRP) deputy director, describes the most important messages that have arisen out of this national multi-faceted exploration of teaching and learning practice

Jo McShane used to think that pedagogy was just a stuffy academic way of saying ‘teaching’, but after attending a conference on the subject she finds that it means a great deal more

Jeremy Cunningham shows how schools can ensure ‘just’ disciplinary procedures

The idea that it is possible to raise attainment by teaching according to individual learners’ styles is a popular one, but is it grounded in strong research evidence? Elaine Hall reports

Listening to what students themselves have to say about their education is an important part of high-quality G&T provision. Year 8 pupil, Beth Hancox outlines her thoughts on the qualities of a good teacher for gifted and talented students

Some people find it easier to work with steady, gentle background sound rather than absolute silence, writes Mark McKergow

Mark McKergow suggests ways of using music to stimulate creativity in your pupils

Lesley Hendy examines how you can look after your voice when teaching outside and also gives some tips on reading aloud

Mark McKergow describes how music can be used at the end of your lessons, as a soundtrack for your students to review their learning

Barry Mapp introduces the capabilities of Mind Mapping and explains some of the features that make it unique

In the first episode of her diary, drama teacher Julie Leoni writes about reconciling her emotional literacy programme with the school’s focus on targets and achievement.

Pupil discipline provisions enshrined in the Education and Inspections Act 2006 came into force in April 2007. Solicitor Dai Durbridge interprets what these measures will mean for work in schools

The relationship between teachers and teaching assistants is a changing one. Angela Youngman investigates and offers guidance to ensure effectiveness

‘Personalised learning’ has been appearing with increasing frequency in policy documents and in discussion about teaching and learning for the last few years. But what is truly meant by ‘personalised learning’?

Sue Roffey describes her way of thinking about how to relate more deeply with students in the classroom.

We are constantly trying to drive up standards of teaching and learning with new approaches, preferably those with a strong evidence base. But is ‘What Works?’ the right question? Should we really be asking ‘How do good teachers get better?’ Elaine Hall reflects on the messages from a meta-analysis of teaching and learning interventions.

In an edited excerpt from his new book, clinical psychologist Steve Killick writes about the importance of listening to young people.

Secondary drama teacher Julie Leoni writes about how she teaches through the darkest days of winter

How can you handle children’s surprise at a new classmate’s disfigurement in a way that is positive for everybody? Jane Frances of Changing Faces offers some practical ideas.

Patricia Lee explains how we can help children to acquire ‘pitch’.

Lev S. Vygotsky is the subject of Steve Mynard’s article on the psychology of child development.

Carole Farrar continues her series on communication with parents.

Programme director Claire Finka writes about how the Sheffield-based Juniper programme helps children find a way to cope with stress.

Carole Farrar continues her series by looking at ways to make the most of personal contact with your parents.

Steve Mynard opens a series of articles on educational thinkers who have influenced our approaches to early education.

Jane West looks at some misconceptions about giftedness and how to dispel them.

Geography can reward the inquisitiveness of young children, says Steve Mynard.

Margaret Collins describes how children can learn to be risk assessors.

Mary Mahoney examines our responsibilities when asked to give medicine to children.

Extending vocabulary when talking or listening to children is a good way to develop their emotional language. Margaret Collins describes two ways of doing this.

Margo Turnbull explores the development of children’s communication skills, by focusing on the role of the practitioner.

We all know that learning to read is a very important step for any child to make, but how can we be sure that we are offering children the best introduction to this skill. Roger Hurn unpicks some of the issues currently under debate.

Steve Mynard explores a process to enrich your children’s language and literacy experiences.

Teaching Expertise is delighted to announce our sponsorship of a teacher’s expedition to Antarctica, exploring how humans cope with extremes.

Assessment is dependent upon our observations of the children. Anne O’Brien, an experienced teacher and headteacher of young children, explores how we can use the observations we have made to inform the next stage of our planning.

Steve Mynard looks at the place of drama in your setting and how existing practice can be enhanced.

A love of stories is common to all young children, and by telling stories, rather than reading them, a storyteller can really bring the tale to life and make it a more interactive experience for the children. Former headteacher Steve Mynard explains how everyone has the ability to become a storyteller, it is just a matter of following some easy guidelines.

John Cousins is a primary mental health worker, supporting children and their families. He explains what we mean by ‘transitions’ and how they can affect the child.

Angela Youngman talked with Justine O’Driscoll of the Bedford Just Learning Nursery about making computers accessible for children in the early years.

Children’s therapist John Cousins examines the concept of self-esteem, which is integral to a child reaching Early Learning Goals in the PSE area of learning.

Margaret Collins looks at ways to raise children’s awareness of sun protection.

Attachment theory is explored here by Steve Mynard, who summarises some of the research and suggests ways that you could use this in your setting.

In his regular column Dr Graham Haydon argues that when the principles of justice and care are combined a more beneficial outcome is likely to be achieved.

In a special feature which encourages informed and responsible ways of tackling abuses of power Dr Christopher Williams suggests that young people make use of new web resources.

Semantic knowledge is the ability to understand narrative. This includes the ability to understand the meanings of words in different contexts, as well as a knowledge of the meaning of relationships between words. The activities listed here will help develop semantic knowledge.

Word finding is the ability to access vocabulary from the long-term memory. These activities can help develop word finding skills and can be used in lessons for the benefit of all pupils.

Listening is the ability to attend to sounds across a range of stimuli. Pupils with listening and attention difficulties have one of two problems…

Spatial awareness is the ability to be aware of oneself in space. Awareness of spatial relationships is the ability to see two or more objects in relation to each other and to oneself. These activities will help develop spatial awareness skills and can be used in lessons for the benefit of all pupils.

Visual comprehension is the ability to listen to information that has been given orally, then remember it, understand it and use the information across a range of tasks. These activities can help develop skills in this area, and can be incorporated into lessons for the benefit of all pupils.

Visual perception is the ability to recognise, interpret and organise visual images. The activities listed here will help develop visual perception skills and can be incorporated into lessons to benefit all pupils.

Auditory memory is the ability to recall information that has been given orally. The activities listed here can help develop auditory memory and can be incorporated into lessons for the benefit of all pupils.

Visual memory is the ability to recall information that has been presented visually. The activities listed here can help develop visual memory and can be incorporated into a lesson for the benefit of all pupils.

Visual discrimination is the ability to recognise similarities and differences between visual images. The activities listed here can help develop visual discrimination skills and can be used in lessons to benefit all children.

Phonological awareness is the ability to be aware of sounds within words and to be able to break down words into syllables and into phonemes. The activities listed here can help develop phonological awareness and can be used in lessons for the benefit of all children.

Auditory discrimination is the ability to detect similarities and differences when listening to sounds. The activities listed here can be used to strengthen auditory discrimination skills and can be incorporated into a lesson to benefit all children.

In his regular column, Dr Graham Haydon argues that in responding to multiculturalism, we need to think hard about the idea of culture.

Critical thinking skills can help us unpack national stereotypes. Dr Christopher Williams proposes strategies and resources focusing on the image of young people in Palestine.

John Potter says citizenship gives education meaning and purpose – and students seem to agree.

In his regular column, Dr Graham Haydon asks whether tolerance has become an easy option, which allows us to continue with an underlying disapproval of others because they are different.

In his regular column, Dr Graham Haydon argues that, despite appearances, PSHE as well as citizenship has a role in education for democracy.

Educational consultant Mike Fleetham shares some interesting ideas about choosing books and looks at some practical ideas for using stories to develop children’s thinking.

Global citizenship benchmarks for secondary schools.

To mark Martin Luther King day, students wrote poems on social responsibility themes.

On Martin Luther King Day, suggestions from Year 8 and 9 students at Benjamin Britten High School.

Angela Youngman finds out about a scheme to improve communication in early years settings through the use of sign language.

Lesley Hendy considers how the teacher’s voice affects pupils’ behaviour and their ability to learn

Andy Bowman explores strategies to begin to develop independence and resourcefulness in young learners.

Bill Lucas explores the phrase ‘accelerated learning,’ and its associated curious, if well-meaning, misconceptions

In her final article on how teachers use emotions, teacher trainer Susan Gibbs discusses why emotional safety is so important in enabling children and young people to learn.

Some key findings from research on how teachers can use groups to boost young people’s achievement

The Teacher Support Network has set up an online advice, information and support service for teachers. This will supplement the existing telephone service, which offers counselling to around 17,000 teachers and lecturers every year.

Many schools participate in National Storytelling Week (held in January), organised by the Society for Storytelling. This article describes how traditional stories can help to address difficult emotional issues, and stresses the importance of letting children and young people find their own meanings in the stories that they hear.

Groupwork needs a bigger role in classroom practice, according to the findings of the SPRinG (Social Pedagogic Research into Groupwork) project, carried out over five years by researchers at the universities of London, Cambridge and Brighton.

DOES the right to freedom of religion entitle teachers to inflict corporal punishment on children if parents authorise it?

Julie Bennett suggests three different techniques that you can use to motivate learners and add further dimensions to your teaching

On the 250th anniversary of Mozart’s birth, Garry Burnett used the composer as a model to question whether creative skills such as problem-solving and interpretation can be taught

G&T coordinator Jo McShane reflects on how far things have come since she did her own PGCE and provides some strategies to share with NQTs and teacher trainees.

Since September 2005, as part of the new framework for inspection for children’s services, schools are expected to demonstrate how they are contributing to the five national outcomes for children stipulated by Every Child Matters and the Children Act 2004.

SWOT is a frequently used management tool, useful for reflection, decision-making and appraising options

Win it or lose it within the first three minutes, by Nicola Fahey

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